Pour some Chrome on Firefox

One thing I do like about Google’s new browser, unveiled last week, is the refreshing sky bluish theme that I am sure helps feel it more responsive, and clean.

Obviously I am not the only one and after less than a week since its release, there are already not one but two ways to reproduce Chrome’s fresh look in Firefox 3.

Chromifox, is a Firefox theme created by  falconer, that brings the sky blue, reproduces the tabs aspect and rounded menus.

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WebChunks: even better than the real thing

One of the new features introduced by Internet Explorer 8 Beta 1 (and still present in Beta 2) is WebSlices, a cool feature that lets you subscribe not to a page but to a summarized version of it including images and styling, provided the web developer has defined a way to access it. Not too long after, Daniel Glazman, of Nvu fame, released a quick implementation of WebSlices called WebChunks, a Firefox extension, that was subject to the same limitation.

But WebChunks 0.3, released today, breaks all the rules and lets you subscribe to any element in any page: go to any page, press the WebChunks button, and select Create your own webchunk in current page. Then you just have to click on the element you want to subscribe to, and you’re done. And it does it without the previous dependency on the Greasemonkey extension.

WebChunks is a dream. It can effectively replace several other extensions in a few seconds. For example I have set it to check for today’s featured Firefox add-on, weather in San Juan, Lima and Geneva, the status of hurricane Ike, a couple of eBay items and even the current Mozilla Links poll, all within minutes and without the need of any other extension.

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Connecting the web with Firefox and Ubiquity

Mozilla Labs has released the first public release of Ubiquity, a Firefox extension that has been in the works for a few months now and introduced during the Mozilla Summit, last month.

It is really hard to explain what it does but here are a couple of examples:

One:

  • select a piece of text you want to translate
  • press Ctrl + Space to invoke the Ubiquity command line, type trans and press Enter.
  • a translated version of the selected text replaces the content in the actual page.

Two:

  • select a piece of text you want to share by email
  • press Ctrl + Space to invoke the Ubiquity command line, type email this to, select a contact (pulled from your Gmail contacts) and press Enter.
  • you get a Gmail compose page ready for you to press Send to complete the asked action.

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